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12 June 2017


Samira, only two years old, walked for 125km with her mother and brother in Somalia in search of water and food. Samira’s father and three other siblings were left with relatives along the way as they were too weak to continue. Photo: Muse Mohammed/UN Migration Agency (IOM) April 2017

UN Migration Agency Joins Civil Society and UN Initiative Calling for Global Compacts to Protect Migrant Children 

With intergovernmental discussions leading up to the Global Compacts on Migration and Refugees currently taking place, all parties must work together to address the needs of migrant children consistent with their human rights.

Today (12/06), at the Global Conference on Children on the Move, in Berlin, Germany, the UN Migration Agency (IOM) joined more than 20 UN and civil society organizations to unite around the rights of children, especially children on the move. The conference with more than 250 participants from States, civil society, academia, UN agencies, private sector and individual experts aims to ensure that both Global Compacts – on migrants and on refugees - take into account children's priorities and concerns.  

Read more 



Ahmad, Maen and Youssif and their father last month. Video: UN Migration Agency (IOM) 2017

Ahmad, Maen and Youssif

Ahmad, Maen and Youssif all under the age of seven where reunited with their father last month. When their mother died fleeing Syria with them, the boys found themselves alone in Turkey. IOM's team in Turkey helped the boys and worked to reunite them with their father in Germany. "If there was a regular way for us to escape, my boys would still have their mother," said their father at the airport, seeing his sons for the first time in months.

To learn more about the IOM's Family Assistance Programme, please visit its Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/IOM.Family.Assistance.Programme/.



The UN Migration Agency joins Save the Children and other Civil Society and UN partners to call for the Global Compacts on Migration and Refugees to protect migrant children.

Watch video from young people on the move here.


Migration in the News


  • Crossing The Border as an Unaccompanied Child - For unaccompanied migrant children, the only thing harder than crossing the border is the journey back home.

    That's why Hernan made his plan: He would travel 1,500 miles north and cross the United States border, where he planned to meet his uncle, who works for a restaurant in North Carolina. The hope was to get a job, earn some money, and send it back home. "It was my idea," Hernan says. "I wanted to come."

  • Number of Children Migrating Solo Around the World Has Increased Five-Fold, UNICEF Say -  (DAKAR, Senegal), Authorities have documented more than 300,000 children migrating alone worldwide over a two-year period, marking a dramatic escalation of a trend that has forced many young refugees into slavery and prostitution, the U.N. children's agency said Wednesday. 

  • This Is What Life Is Like For The Forgotten Children Of Calais - It has been six months since the notorious Calais "Jungle" camp was demolished – but many people have been left behind, including kids. 

    Under shadows cast by electric pylons, a group of young people sit on the grass near a motorway leading to the English Channel. Some play football with a stone on the gravel. Nearby are sand dunes and chemical factories, and chimneys dominate the grey skyline.

  • World Day against Child Labour 2017: "In conflicts and disasters, protect children from child labour"

    "Children in areas affected by conflict and disasters are among the most vulnerable. No child must be left behind." says ILO Director-General Guy Ryder in his statement for World Day Against Child Labour.

    On World Day Against Child Labour, 2017 , we are emphasizing the plight of children caught up in conflicts and disasters, and who are at particular risk of child labour.

Media Contacts
For interviews and other media requests, please contact the IOM Media and Communications team here.