Unable to see images? Click here

09 August 2017

Comments/questions: editor@iom.int

Image
LinkedIn
 
Twitter
 
Medium
 
Instagram
 
YouTube
 
Facebook
 
IOM
 
 

main banner

The true image of undocumented America captures the beauty and complexity of the lives of working people seen as they truly are. Todd Heisler/The New York Times

Avoiding the Trap of Immigration Media Clichés
(The New York Times) Los Angeles – See if you can ride along with some agents from Immigration and Customs Enforcement rounding up Latino immigrants, the photo editor tells the photographer. Go capture a group of brown-skinned innocents being led away in cuffs. And if one of the ICE agents is also Latino, the editor adds, so much the better.

In the Trump era, such conversations are unfolding again and again in newsrooms across the United States. Our best “shooters” are sent out on a hunt for images of undocumented immigrants at perhaps the most vulnerable and degrading moment in their lives.

These images have been a staple of American journalism for as long as I’ve been in the business. Very often, they seem a kind of immigration porn.

Read more

 

main banner

‘Osman’, a refugee from Afghanistan trains taekwondo to young Indonesians. Photo: UN Migration Agency/ Muse Mohammed 2016

Afghan Taekwondo Enthusiast Uses Free Time to Train Young Indonesians 

(IOM) Indonesia – Osman (name changed) began training in Taekwondo as a child in Afghanistan. At a young age, he was inspired by two-time Olympic bronze medalist Rohullah Nikpai, who is an ethnic Hazara like himself.

“It is not easy being a Hazara in Afghanistan; we are often discriminated against by other ethnic groups and the Taliban who do not see us as ‘real’ Afghans,” he says. “When I saw Rohullah at the Olympics I felt that anything was possible if I tried hard enough.”

Read here | Watch here

 

main banner

Muhannad Qaiconie, one of the founders of the 'Baynetna' cultural centre in Berlin speaks to a visitor to the centre's library. Jona Kallgren, AP, 2017

Migrant Centre in Berlin Brings Germany Arabic Culture 

(Associated Press) Berlin – Germany is the country of Goethe and Kant, Bach and Beethoven. But recent migrants are hoping to sprinkle Arabic poetry and Middle Eastern music, into that mix.

At the "Between Us" cultural center in the German capital, migrants meet regularly to share their art, poetry and music – both to provide a flavor of home, and to educate the native citizens of their new home.

"There are almost no libraries with Arabic books or institutions for Arab culture here," said Muhannad Qaiconie, the 30-year-old founder of the center.

"Still, Berlin is now a hotspot for Syrian authors, artists and musicians, and we want to give them a meeting place and a platform."

Nearly 900,000 migrants flooded into Germany in 2015 and hundreds of thousands more have arrived since then, the largest single group being refugees fleeing war-torn Syria.

Read more

 

2017 Global Migration Film Festival: Call for Entries. Promote the film festival and our call for film submissions. Read more

Image

IOM X is the International Organization for Migration's innovative campaign to encourage safe migration and public action to stop exploitation and human trafficking. The campaign is produced in partnership with the United States Agency for International Development (USAID). Read more



Binta: "After I was smuggled, I felt discouraged. I didn’t have it in me to fight to get to Italy, to be one of those people on the boats."
Share on Twitter  | Facebook

Image

On 4 August, UN Migration Agency (IOM) Director General William Lacy Swing wished 132 stranded migrants a safe flight home to Guinea Conakry from Mitiga airport in Tripoli, Libya. Watch here

Image

A global database tracking data on deceased and missing migrants along migratory routes.
Please visit: 
MissingMigrants.iom.int

Image

For the latest Mediterranean Update data on arrivals and fatalities please visit: http://migration.iom.int/europe 

Image

Read more here

 

Migration in the News


  • Thomson Reuters Foundation and Nam News Network reported that traffickers in Niger are taking African migrants dreaming of reaching Europe on more dangerous routes through the Sahara desert in order to avoid detection after a government crackdown on smuggling.
     
  • AFP reported that life has suddenly got tougher for the charity boats trying to stop migrants drowning off Libya.
     
  • Maclean’s reported that in a world that has largely turned its back on millions of refugees, a new generation of smugglers and con artists are emerging and Canada is fast becoming their cash cow.
     
  • UN News Centre, Xinhua and Prensa Latina reported that rapid responses are critical to stemming a cholera outbreak that has afflicted South Sudan for more than a year, exacerbating an already dire humanitarian situation that has left approximately four million people displaced by conflict.
     
  • The East African Business reported that the Burundi government has said it will waive taxes on capital or businesses of Burundians returning home.
     
  • Channel Africa reported that IOM has called for the creation of safe channels of migration for African nationals fleeing to Europe.

Trending on the Internet


  • The New York Times reported that the argument for low-skilled immigration is not just about filling an employment hole. The millions of immigrants of little skill who swept into the work force in the 25 years up to the onset of the Great Recession have largely improved the lives of Americans.

 

Media Contacts
For interviews and other media requests, please contact the IOM Media and Communications team here.