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06 July 2018

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Facing the press in Tripoli, Ambassador Swing delivered a powerful message about protecting migrants’ rights. Photo: IOM

DG Swing Asks Libya Not to Send Rescued Migrants Back to Detention

Posted on Fri. July 6, 2018​​

Tripoli – William Lacy Swing, head of IOM, the UN Migration Agency, appealed to the Libyan authorities to stop detaining migrants after they have been intercepted by the Coast Guard after seeking to cross the Mediterranean. IOM also seeks to speed up the process of voluntary return of migrants to their countries of origin.

“In my meeting with Prime Minister al-Sarraj I appealed that migrants brought back to shore or rescued by the Coast Guard not be put into detention centres,” said Ambassador Swing. “Those who wish to go home should be speedily and voluntarily returned to their countries of origin rather than linger in detention.”

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Mediterranean Migrant Arrivals Reach 46,449 in 2018; Deaths Reach 1,412

Posted on Fri. July 6, 2018​​

Geneva – IOM, the UN Migration Agency, reports that 46,449 migrants and refugees entered Europe by sea through the first half of 2018. That total compares to 101,213 at this time last year, and over 231,503 at this time in 2016.

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UN Migration Agency in Chad Appeals for Funding to Assist Stranded Migrants

Posted on Fri. July 6, 2018​​

N’Djamena – Last Sunday (01/07), 20 Sub-Saharan migrants, including eight potential victims of trafficking, were reportedly stranded in Faya, in Northern Chad. The town of Faya is located on one of the main migration routes in Northern Chad, where the Chadian authorities have repeatedly identified and referred victims of trafficking (VoTs) to IOM, the UN Migration Agency.

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  • Devex interviewed IOM Bangladesh Chief of Mission George Gigauri on IOM’s post-monsoon priorities for the Rohingya refugees in Cox’s Bazar.
     
  • Al Jazeera reported that in March, the Oba of Benin, the Edo people's traditional ruler, warned traffickers against using voodoo curses to control women. The moment brought relief in Italy, but some women have returned to the streets.
     
  • The Economist reported that on the edge of the Sahara, people are mourning the decline of people-smuggling caused by greater efforts to restrict the flow of Africans to Europe through Niger.
     
  • AFP reported that according to rights activists, the expulsions of Haitian migrants from the Dominican Republic are based on racial profiling and the darker skin of Haitians, with many native-born black Dominicans caught up in the process, and families torn apart as a result.
     
  • AKI Press reported that around 60,000 citizens of Kyrgyzstan are at risk of becoming human trafficking victims in the country and beyond.
     
  • Eurasia Review explained how two trends – the growth of cities across the world and climate change – and their interactive effects will increasingly complicate and test civil-military coordination in humanitarian crises.
     
  • Myanmar’s Mizzima reported about the launch ceremony of IOM X’s Media+Tech campaign on safe migration in Yangon.

  • World Economic Forum reported that almost one in ten players in the World Cup were born outside of their country. There are 1,032 players involved in the tournament. Of those, 98 were born beyond the borders of the country they are representing.
     
  • The Guardian reported about a graphic novel peopled by animals which builds the story of an undocumented migrant from the perspectives of those whose paths he crosses.