Unable to see images? Click here

27 June 2018

Comments/questions: editor@iom.int

Image
LinkedIn
 
Twitter
 
Medium
 
Instagram
 
YouTube
 
Facebook
 
IOM
 
 

main banner

Egyptian player Mo Salah is a forward for English side Liverpool. Mitch Gunn / Shutterstock.com

What Football Teaches Us About Migration

Costa Rica  Football is more than just a popular sport in many societies. Regardless of origin, social class or skin colour, if there is any sport that can give one a sense of identity and belonging, it is this one. It doesn’t matter if it is played with a proper ball or a recycled bottle; when a player scores, everyone shouts “GOAL” with the same level of emotion!

Football is not only entertainment that moves the masses: it is a game that awakens passions and contrasts all around the world. The FIFA World Cup is the best example – for weeks the whole world turns its attention to the games. But we rarely think about the fact that the vast majority of players on the field are migrants in their professional careers.

Read more


main banner

First Steps in Helping Returning Migrants Reintegrate in Sudan

Sudan – Between June 2017 and March 2018, IOM, the UN Migration Agency, helped 615 Sudanese migrants return home voluntarily from Libya, a country in its seventh year of crisis. Supporting migrants to psychologically deal with what they experienced before they came home and helping them set out a plan for their future are key to supporting their reintegration into their communities. 

Sudan borders Libya and most migrants cross directly into the country, many hoping to take barely sea-worthy rubber dinghies to Europe. The journey from Sudan to Libya is undertaken not only by Sudanese people but migrants from Ethiopia, Somalia and other countries. 

Read more


Image
Image

The World Cup is on! Read more about #TogetherThroughSport.


Image

Click here to read about the Big Data for Migration Alliance (BD4M)


Image

Read more

 

  • During the World Conference on “Religions, Creeds and Value Systems: Joining Forces to Enhance Equal Citizenship Rights”, IOM Director General William Lacy Swing noted that the world is “basically at odds with itself,” describing the critical state of human migration between countries and continents. His address was quoted by IPS.
     
  • Bangladesh’s New Age reported that heavy rainfall in Cox’s Bazar earlier this month put major strain on the drainage systems of Rohingya camps, which might lead to life-threatening contamination of clean water supplies and create environments in which deadly diseases might thrive.
     
  • European Union External Action reported on a discussion between the European Commission, IOM and UNHCR in view of the upcoming European Council, where migration will be high on the agenda.
     
  • Reuters reported that IOM and UNHCR will present the European Union with a plan for “regional disembarkation platforms” around the Mediterranean.
     
  • Reuters reported that the number of migrants dying from extreme heat on the US-Mexico border rose 55 percent in the past nine months after an increase in unaccompanied children and families trying to enter the United States irregularly.
     
  • DW reported that the refusal of Mediterranean countries to let ships carrying rescued refugees dock at their ports poses a big problem for aid organizations.

  • Ozy reported that a growing number of African-origin players born or naturalized in Europe are returning to represent their parents' countries at tournaments like the World Cup.
     
  • Euronews published an op-ed which noted that circular migration should be on Europe’s agenda.