Chinese, European Experts Share Techniques for Detection of Fraudulent Travel Documents

Posted: 
10/19/18
Themes: 
Integrated Border Management

Kunming – The UN Migration Agency (IOM) and the Chinese National Immigration Administration (NIA) this week organized a two-day technical workshop in Kunming on the detection of fraudulent travel documents.

Speakers, at the event, which ends today, included experts from FRONTEX, the Netherlands, France, Germany, Portugal and China. Participants included some 60 Chinese officials from central and provincial authorities and representatives of European Union (EU) Embassies and Consulates based in China.

Delegates highlighted the need to continuously develop innovative methods to curb document and identity fraud, including the use of big data analytics, to keep up with increasingly sophisticated efforts by criminals to evade border controls.

Speaking at the workshop, IOM Officer in Charge in China Richard Fairbrother said: “This discussion is hugely valuable because this challenge cannot be effectively addressed in isolation and requires concerted efforts with international partners.”

The Head of FRONTEX’s Centre of Excellence for Combatting Document Fraud Claudio Kavrecic said: “Equipping frontline officers with training on examination techniques and sharing of latest trends on fraudulent practices is crucial.  It is the first and often the only opportunity for the authorities at the border to detect any possible forgery.”

The workshop is one of a series of trainings on document fraud organized under the framework of IOM’s EU-China Dialogue on Migration and Mobility Support Project, which is funded by the Partnership Instrument of the European Union. IOM supports Chinese government efforts to enhance the country’s capacity to combat irregular migration.      

For further information please contact Paddy Siyanga Knudsen at IOM China. Tel. +8618514668590, Email: pknudsen@iom.int

  • Chinese and European officials meet in Kunming to share best practices in combating travel document fraud. Photo: IOM